Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism spiking your allergies? Look at gut function

seasonal-allergies-leaky-gut

Do beautiful spring days have you cooped up inside, sneezing and sniffing miserably? Did your allergies kick in or get worse after your Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism condition developed? Before reaching for the antihistamines, consider the role your gut health plays in both allergy symptoms and Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism.

As with Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, allergies actually begin long before the hallmark symptoms of sniffling, sneezing, and itchy eyes manifest. How?

An estimated 80 percent of the immune system resides in the gut, and when digestive problems set in, immune problems are sure to follow. A chronically inflamed gut—which causes indigestion, heartburn, bloating, pain, diarrhea, constipation, irritable bowel disorders, and more—sends the immune system into overdrive.

As a result, the body becomes hypersensitive and overreacts to stuff it shouldn’t, including pollen, grass, and other triggers associated with spring. It may also react to the body’s own tissue, such as the thyroid gland, triggering Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism.

Because allergy symptoms frequently start with poor digestive function, the gut is a great place to start for relief not only from allergy symptoms, but from symptoms of Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism as well.

What causes allergy symptoms?

Several factors contribute to the digestive problems that give rise to both allergy symptoms and autoimmune disease, including:

  • Dysbiosis: This is a very common scenario in which bad bacteria in the gut overwhelm the beneficial bacteria. Processed foods, a diet lacking in cultured and fermented foods, and antibiotic use contribute to dysbiosis.
  • Gluten and other food intolerances: Gluten has been shown to damage the lining of the intestines. Also, many people have an immune reaction to gluten and other foods, such as dairy or soy. Eating these foods constantly provokes the immune system and damages the lining of the intestines. A number of studies also link gluten intolerance to Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism.
  • Low stomach acid: This may seem counter-intuitive as so many people complain of an acidic stomach, but, in fact, low stomach acid often underlies heartburn and acid reflux. When stomach acid is low, undigested food backwashes into the esophagus (heartburn), opportunistic bacteria overtake the stomach, improperly digested food degrades the intestinal lining, and bacteria and other pathogens are able enter into the intestines. Sufficient stomach acid is also necessary to trigger the gallbladder to release bile and the pancreas to release enzymes, two important processes for digestion.
  • Poor liver detoxification: Gut damage causes chronic inflammation, which keeps the immune system on red alert and overburdens the liver. As a result, the liver can’t adequately detoxify pathogens that escaped through the damaged intestinal lining into the bloodstream. This is another factor that triggers the immune system and leads to allergies.

Fix the gut to fix allergies and manage Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism

Repairing gut health involves addressing the various factors above. The exact protocol may vary from person to person depending on his or her individual needs. However, a great place to start is with an anti-inflammatory diet that removes food intolerances and calms inflammation, helping to restore balance to an overactive immune system. We can also use lab tests to gain insight into the specific nature of your intestinal problems. Probiotics, and nutritional compounds to improve digestion, support detoxification, and tame an overstimulated immune system can also help repair the gut and hence the immune system.

Ask my office for ideas on how you can get to the root of your seasonal allergy symptoms this year and manage your Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism condition.

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